28–30 March 2017 | Perth, Western Australia

Underground mining continues to progress at deeper levels and industry is now extracting mineral reserves at depth that previously would have been considered unmineable. Deep mining is a very technical and challenging environment. A high level of understanding and technically sound approaches are essential to satisfactorily deal with the significant geotechnical (from squeezing ground to rockbursts) and logistical (transportation, ventilation) issues of deep and high stress mining, and best practice and innovation need to be implemented.

The Australian Centre for Geomechanics looks forward to hosting the Eighth International Conference on Deep and High Stress Mining in Perth in March 2017. This follows the previous conferences held in Sudbury, 2014; Perth, 2012; Santiago, 2010; Perth, 2007; Quebec City, 2006; Johannesburg, 2004; and Perth, 2002.

ABSTRACTS DUE 4 JULY 2016

CONFERENCE THEMES

• Geotechnical and financial risk assessment and

management

• Numerical and empirical design and analysis

• Case histories (success stories as well as failures)

• Rock mass response to mining (rockbursts and seismicity, squeezing ground)

• Occupational health and safety

• Ground support

• Blasting

• Ventilation

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Intending authors are requested to prepare and submit their abstracts before 4 July 2016. Abstracts should be limited to less than 500 words. Abstracts for Deep Mining 2017 can be submitted online at www.deepmining2017.com/authors or via email to publications-acg@uwa.edu.au

ARO

Planning for the 50th US Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium in Houston from 26-29 June 2016 is well underway. Nearly 650 abstracts were accepted for the symposium. The abstracts suggest there will be very strong oral and poster sessions, spanning petroleum, civil, mining, and interdisciplinary topics in rock mechanics and geomechanics. Continuing the trend from the last few years, a very large number of abstracts and sessions revolve around "interdisciplinary" topics that are of interest to civil, mining, and petroleum geomechanics professionals and showcase the unique value of the symposium to ARMA members.

In addition to the strong technical program, ARMA will host six geomechanics-related workshops and two short courses. Workshops will be held on Hydraulic Fracturing, Geomechanics in Unconventionals, Laboratory Geomechanics Testing, Reservoir Engineering Applied to Geothermal, Microseismic Geomechanics, and an ARMA Future Leaders-Student workshop. Short courses will be taught on Shale Gas Geoengineering and Modeling of Coupled-Hydro-Mechanical Deformation and Fracturing.

The Symposium will feature the first ARMA Distinguished Lecture, offered by Richard Goodman. The MTS Lecture will be presented by Peter Kaiser; William Ellsworth, Jean-Claude Roegiers, and Charles Fairhurst will be featured in keynote lectures. Technical tours will highlight Houston's petroleum history (tours to Spindletop and the Ocean Star Offshore Drilling Rig) and geology (tour of active faults in the Houston area).

The symposium will be held at the Westin Galleria Hotel and Conference Center. Holding the meeting in Houston will allow a larger number of petroleum-related geomechanics professionals to attend and broaden the interaction between the rock mechanics/ geomechanics disciplines and industries.
Submitted by David Yale, Symposium Chair

For information on the symposium, abstract submission, accommodations, and sponsorship, visit: www.armasymposium.org

Conference Dates:

26 - 29 June 2016

Workshop Dates:

23 - 26 June 2016

Short Course Dates:

25- 26 June 2016

Location:

Westin Galleria, Houston, Texas, USA

Early Registration Deadline:

26 May 2016

Peter Smeallie
Executive Director
American Rock Mechanics Association
600 Woodland Terrace
Alexandria, VA 22302
703-683-1808 (office)
703-997-6112 (fax)
www.armarocks.org

The Strata Control Practical Assessment will be hosted at Northam Platinum Mine (Zondereinde Division) on 18 February 2016. Only twenty candidates will be allowed due to safety precautions. For further information, please contact Sifuso Mashile at Sifiso.Mashile@norplats.co.za

 

VENUE AND DATES DETAILS

  • Venue: Northam Platinum Mine Zondereinde Division
  • Date: 18 February 2016
  • Time: 06:00 am
  • R.S.V.P. before or on 12 February 2016

 

SCHEDULE OF THE DAY

06:00 am– Arrival of all candidates at Northam Platinum Zondereinde Division

07:00 am– Visitors induction

07:30 am– Proceed to underground

11:00 am– Return from underground

11:30 am– Oral exam will commence

Examiners to arrive at 10:00 am

 

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)

Northam Platinum requires the following as PPE:

• Overall with reflectors (if no reflectors a reflective vest must be worn)

• Gum Boots

• Hard hat

• Cap lamp belt

• Ear Plugs

• Safety Glasses

• Socks

• Knee guards (not compulsory)

All candidates to bring their OWN PPE. No PPE will be provided.  

 

Dear Members
 
Please follow the link to the latest quarterly newsletter. Stories and articles are always welcome. Please email Paul Couto at Paul.Couto@Harmony.co.zafor enquiries.

Download the PDF version: pdf  SANIRE Newsletter Volume 2 Issue 1 January 2016 (3.95 MB)

The Chamber of Mines certificates will be phased out on 31 December 2018. These certificates will be replaced by new certificates that will be issued by the QCTO and/or other educational institution. The last entry for new candidates into the system would have been 31 August 2015, but because the assessment tools of the QCTO are not ready this date was postponed until 31 March 2016 for the May 2016 examination.

The last entry for the new candidates will now be 31 August 2016, hopefully the QCTO assessment tools will be ready for the October 2016 examinations as the final entry date cannot be changed.

It must be noted that the final phasing out date of 31 December 2018 for all certificates is final.

 

 

The SANIRE AGM was held on the 27th November 2015 at the Ruimsig Country Club. The new format of the AGM comprised of the formalities in the morning followed by lunch and ended off with a round of golf. The AGM provided an overview of the SANIRE strategy for the next 2-5 years. Recognition to outstanding commitment, contribution and achievement through the various award categories was also presented. The AGM was well attended and will hopefully continue to do so in the future. A special thanks must be given to Carol Hunter for all her hard work in making the AGM possible.

2016 SANIRE NATIONAL COUNCIL  
NAME PORTFOLIO
Michael du Plessis: President, Awards; RETC
William Joughin ISRM, SAIMM, Eng works, AfriRock
Les Gardner RE Legislation, RETC, SIMRAC
Friedemann Essrich Treasurer, MQA, QCTO, L1-L4 training
Jannie Maritz Future education (RE ticket)
Yolande Jooste Exams committee, Video lectures
Dave Neal Membership, RETC
Hein Greef / Jannie Maritz Young members
Jaco le Roux Website
Robert Armstrong Organisation Liaison
Dave Arnold History, RETC
Paul Couto Newsletter

 

CHAIRMANS BRANCH 
Naomi Ayres Western Limb
Andreas Esterhuizen Eastern Limb
Temogo Itholeng Freestate
Sandor Petho Coal
Sandy Etchells Gauteng
Glen McGavigan Surface Mining
Quintin Grix North West
Obed Masinge

Northern Cape

 

AWARD RECIPIENT 
Best student Award - Best student at Pretoria University Kara Lombard
Best student Award – Best student at Wits University Lunghile Ngobeni 
Candidate Award - Highest mark > 75% for SCO Theory 85% -Bennett Macuacua
Candidate Award - Highest mark > 75% for Paper 1 82% - Gift Thantsha
Candidate Award - Highest mark > 75% for Paper 2 88% - Jennifer Pilkington
Candidate Award - Highest mark > 75% for Paper 3.1 76% - Moses Modika
Practitioner of the Year Award - Rock Engineer, Strata Control Officer or Observer who contributed significantly outside of what is required by role

Otto van der Merwe

 

agm1 agm2 agm3
Practitioner of the Year Award
Otto van der Merwe (Left)
Michael du Plessis (Right)
Candidate Award - Highest mark
> 75% for SCO Theory
Bennett Macuacua (Left)
Michael du Plessis (Right)
Candidate Award - Highest mark
> 75% for Paper 3.1
Moses Modika (Left)
Michael du Plessis (Right)

 

AWARD RECIPIENT
Lifetime Achievement Award - Honorary Membership - Person who made significant contribution - Non technical Apie van Rensburg

Lifetime Achievement Award - Honorary Fellowship - Person who made significant contribution - Technical or other

Michael Roberts
Salamon Award - Person with best (also significant) refereed technical publication

P.J le Roux and Dick Stacey

Measurement and prediction of dilution in a South African gold mine operating with open stoping mining methods

Ortlepp Award - Person with best (also significant) refereed technical publication (less than 35 years old)

A.G Hartzenberg

The influence of regional structures associated with the Bushveld Complex on the mechanism driving the behaviour of the UG2 hangingwall beam and in-stope pillars at Lonmin’s Marikana Operations.

 

 agm4 agm5 
Michael du Plessis, Prof Dick Stacey, Dr Jaco le Roux Apie van Rensburg
agm6 agm7
Alida Hartzenburg and Michael du Plessis Michael du Plessis and Kim Roberts

 

 

pc1At the AGM held in November 2015, we recognised some of our members for their extraordinary achievements and contributions to our fraternity through the grants of awards in various categories. As Rock Engineers, just doing our jobs, we do not always realise the influence we have on those around us. Through mentoring, we develop the skills of our colleagues and we instil a culture of caring, self-worth, ambition and recognition.

In the workplace as technical specialists, we are responsible for ensuring the safety of thousands of workers through our routine monitoring. Our selfless efforts are not always recognised and typically the areas where we make the largest contributions are celebrated by the industry at events such as MineSafe. However, the efforts of the Rock Engineers and the Rock Engineering Departments are not credited for their interventions which contribute to a safer working environment. As a service department, we do not contribute to the bottom line, but we can contribute strongly through our dedication and involvement. In December, the Principal Inspector of the North-West region issued an instruction for all mines in the Rustenburg area to stop their operations and instructed that all areas be assessed by Rock Engineers to ensure that our workers do not work unsafely or become exposed to an unsafe working environment during the “silly season”. The DMR, therefore, recognises the skills we have in the field of strata control.

There are many factors influencing the behaviour of the workers at the face. We can, however, influence their behaviour through ongoing coaching, in the workplace, at the face. Our contributions can only add value to processes such as the entry examination and TARP, which is aimed at creating a safe working environment. We should realise that our actions will assist in upskilling our workers at the face. We can, therefore, make a difference by caring and sharing. It goes beyond celebrating fall-of-ground fatality free shifts or setting new records.

Michael du Plessis - SANIRE President

ebenezerEbenezer Gordon Holder
24 May 1956 - 07 December 2015

I have known Gordon for many years, and worked with him between 1996 and 2002, when I was a member of the Rock Engineering Department at Anglo Platinum at that time. He was the Chief Rock Mechanics Officer. Gordon spent most of his career at Anglo Platinum, and because in the early years there were only a few Rock Engineers employed, he had an intimate knowledge about all the producing shafts.

His time keeping was exemplary, if not extreme – he was always the first to arrive in the office in the mornings and the last to leave in the afternoons. When asked why, his answer was perhaps unsurprising: “My job is my life”.

Another part of Gordon’s work which deserves mentioning was his record keeping and I never saw anyone else doing the same. For underground visits, Gordon had small A6 black books where he wrote what he observed and recommended on any particular day. He would then transfer some important notes from the A6 underground books into his A4 black books which he kept for his daily, planning and various meetings notes. Furthermore, he kept both his book formats bound in clearly labelled volumes. So, if you asked him what he did on any specific day, month and year, Gordon would look into his Register and check which volume and book to open, and he would tell you exactly what he did on that day. All these volumes of books took up most of his vast filing cabinet.

Gordon had very good observation and interpretation skills underground, given his knowledge and long experience. He loved to coach young and upcoming Rock Engineers – like me at that time – and his advice was very valuable. Not only was he a good Rock Engineer, Gordon’s strength was also in his very broad general knowledge regarding mining, engineering, stores management and industrial relations, to mention a few.

Another incredible aspect of Gordon’s life was his ability to speak the Setswana language fluently. He often spoke Setswana with black colleagues in the office or underground and one could see how much they appreciated that.

Gordon left Anglo Platinum in 2009 to spend his time elsewhere; Samancor chrome mines being the last place.

After his sudden passing, Gordon left behind his wife Jenny and his sister Fiona. Gordon’s plans were to retire and move with his wife to the Western Cape where his sister lives. Sadly, Gordon could not fulfil his dream.

By Petr Miovsky
Rock Engineering Manager – Impala Platinum

krugerPaul Kruger van der Heever.
25 April 1947 – 22 December 2015

It is with great personal sadness that I informed you that our friend, colleague and associate of Groundwork passed away peacefully this morning after a long and stoic battle against cancer.

Paul worked on dozens of projects for us after we were fortunately enough to secure the services of this immensely capable man in September 2006. He conducted many geological mapping and stress measurement site evaluation projects, as well as assisting with other geotechnical investigations. For those of you who didn’t know Paul well, he was a geologist and chemist by training who then specialised by obtaining the Chamber of Mines Rock Mechanics Certificate, and also obtained a Master’s Degree in Seismology. His desire to acquire knowledge was endless and he was awarded an MBA Cum Laude while working as the manager of Gencor’s Technical Services Department in Klerksdorp in the 1980s.

Paul was also an incredibly active man who played golf regularly off a low handicap and ran numerous long distance races, including Comrades many times. He had a remarkable and active mind and had many interests and hobbies. However, his passion always seemed to be geology. I called him our bionic geologist as he had the ability to see well beyond the rock surface when making his geological assessments. Despite his incredible technical skills, he had the relatively unique ability to present findings to senior management in a manner which they always understood and appreciated. An example of this is the model he built by himself to assist the shaft personnel to better understand the complex geology at Kloof Main Shaft. He did this in his spare time, without compensation, out of his own enthusiasm for the project. He was always keen to share his formidable knowledge to help others grow and develop.

Paul touched the lives of many people and he will be sorely missed. At this time, our thoughts are with his wife Bets, his children, Paul Junior, Lisa and Marissa, and his six grandchildren.

Kind regards, Phil.
Director - Groundwork Consulting

International Symposium on Slope Stability in Open Pit Mining and Civil Engineering

slope

Dr Loren Lorig presenting his keynote (Photo curtesy of S Coetsee)

 

The Sixth Slope Stability Symposium was held in Cape Town from the 12th to the 14th of October 2015, hosted by SANIRE in conjunction with SAIMM. The symposium was originally held in Cape Town in 2006 and has subsequently been to Perth (2007), Santiago (2009), Vancouver (2011) and Brisbane (2013). Since it is the only dedicated slope stability conference internationally, it is consistently well attended. While attendance was less than in previous years, as is expected in current times, it still attracted just over 200 delegates, 130 of whom were international. Keynote speakers were Professor Doug Stead from Simon Frasier University, who presented his research on internal failure mechanism during failure, comparing it to current analysis technics; Dr Loren Lorig CEO of Itasca, presented on designing for extreme events; Geogg Beale (Director at Schlumberger Water Services) presented on the importance of surface water management and its impact on slope stability; and Louis Melis (Melis & Du Plessis Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd) presented the recent work he has been doing in designing rock fall protection. Fifty-four papers and ten posters were presented and published in a proceedings volume, a selection of which will be published in an upcoming issue of the SAIMM Journal. A slope stability monitoring workshop was presented on the 15th, organised and facilitated by Huw Thomas from the University of the Witwatersrand. Thanks goes out to the organising committee, SAIMM, presenters and the very generous sponsors!

Robert Armstrong,
Chair, Organising Committee.