rock starFull Name: Thokozani Sidwell Habile

Position: Senior Rock Engineering Officer

Company/ Organisations: AngloGold Ashanti

Date and Place of Birth: 1986 04 30, Piet Retief, Mpumalanga

Education: BSc Honours Computational and Applied Mathematics (Wits)

First Job: Promoting Saturday Star at Clearwater mall (Roodeport)

Personal Best Achievement/s: Achieving my honors degree at Wits and Rock engineering ticket.

Philosophy of Life: Limitations are those you set in your mind, or permit others to set up for you.

Favourite Food/Drink: Pap and braai meat with gravy and spinach

Favourite Sport: Soccer, Cricket

How did your career in the mining industry begin and where are you now?

My career began at Wits University (2004-2008) where I completed my applied maths degree. In 2009 I started in the rock engineering department as an assistant strata control officer where I was doing the numerical modelling for west wits mines and doing instrumentations for projects in place. Then I felt a need of underground exposure which then directed me to Nostrada Rock Mechanics in the Rustenburg where I was working as a Strata control Officer for a year. A year later I moved to BLA (Harmony Kusasalethu mine) which was my first time working as a Rock mechanics officer in a Gold mine, I learned a lot there I must say. Due to personal and reason and moving closer to my family in Mpumalanga, year later I joined Great Basin Gold and by that time I just passed all my 3 Rock mechanics papers. I got retrenched after a month of working there then I returned to AngloGold Ashanti in October 2012 where I got my Rock engineering ticket after 5 attempts. I was appointed as Senior Rock Engineering Officer in 2015.

Why did you choose Rock Engineering?

Rock engineering is technical and it involves lot of mathematics for most decision made in the industry, so that makes it easy for me to understand the concepts used.

Please tell us a bit more about your career journey?

My career journey from high to university was nice and smooth, it started challenging when failed my practical 4 times and that frustrated me a lot because it never happen in my life. But that never stopped me from becoming a rock engineer in fact I became a better rock engineer because I started reading articles and researching about mining. Failing has helped me not only understand my mine but understand the principle of rock engineering so I can be able to apply my knowledge at any mine.

In your opinion, what are some of the challenges that the fraternity is currently facing?

There are 3 challenges I think rock engineering is facing.

  • Rock engineers in the shafts don't have enough time to research and design as shaft work require them to do underground visit and routine rock engineering work. We rely too much on work done by previous rock engineers.
  • There is a lack of transfer of knowledge from experienced rock engineers to the new up and coming ones.
  • The Strata Control Officers having to write reports for the Rock Engineering Practical with content, which they are not exposed to on daily basis.

What are some areas that you believe will become of increasing importance in the near future of the rock engineering discipline?

  • Understanding seismicity and Modelling will be more important as the mines are becoming deeper.
  • The legal responsibilities will be stricter as government is heading for zero harm in the mine industry.

What advice would you offer people aspiring to be in your position?

Do not take a decision that you won't be able to defend when problems arises in future.

Who is your role model/ mentor?

Mr Gary Dukes

What is the best advice you have ever been given?

"When in doubt say no".